Courses

INSS 5180. Selected Problems in Intel.

Selected Problems in Intelligence (1-0) This course will address particularized intelligence and national security issues in depth. Examples of issues that may be investigated are intelligence failures, specific modes of intelligence activity (such as electronic intelligence), or the operational activities of a particular intelligence or national security agency. It may also be used to provide credit for Model NATO or Model Arab programs, in support of study in foreign venues under the Intelligence Community Scholar program, or cross listing with other course offerings at the graduate level. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit.

1 Credit Hour
1 Total Contact Hour
0 Lab Hour
1 Lecture Hour
0 Other Hour

INSS 5280. Selected Problems in Intel.

Selected Problems in Intelligence (2-0) This course will address particularized intelligence and national security issues in depth. Examples of issues that may be investigated are intelligence failures, specific modes of intelligence activity (such as electronic intelligence), or the operational activities of a particular intelligence or national security agency. It may also be used to provide credit for Model NATO or Model Arab programs, in support of study in foreign venues under the Intelligence Community Scholar program, or cross listing with other course offerings at the graduate level. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit.

2 Credit Hours
2 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
2 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5300. Resrch Methods in Intelligence.

This introductory graduate course provides students with the opportunity to develop the qualitative and quantitative research skills necessary to undertake intelligence work. Special attention will be given to the distinct differences between intelligence research and social and behavioral science research. The course demonstrates critically how intelligence data is validated, systematically organized, and processed for a profession that has operational and information security requirements at its core.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5301. Histl Devlpmt of Intel Commty.

The purpose of this course is to present a historical survey of the development of the US Intelligence Community (IC). From the National Security Act of 1947 to the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, this course will chronicle the political, bureaucratic, and operational expnation of the IC. The creation and growth of various IC members, including the CIA, NSA, NRO, DIA, and NGA will be examined. Special focus will be given to issues of coordination, management, and leadership of the IC. The purpose will be to understand the role of intelligence in contemporary American political life and its central place in our country's quest for security.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5302. Sem in Intel & Nat'l Security.

Pro-Seminar in Intelligence and National Security (3-0) This course examines the scope and breadth of contemporary intelligence and national security issues. It serves as a professional overview of the field, detailing the structure and interrelationships of both private sector and government security bureaucracy. Emphasis will also be placed on understanding the role of science in security matters.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5303. Legal Issues/Intel & Nat Sec.

Legal Issues in Intelligence and National Security (3-0) This is a foundation course in the legal aspects, civil and criminal, of intelligence and national security.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5304. Intel & Natl Sec Pol & Proc.

This course will examine the role of intelligence in U.S. national security. Attention will be placed on the organization of the national security bureaucracy and the interagency production of national policy and strategy. Heavy focus will then be given to the development, structure, and leadership of the intelligence community and its relationships with key intelligence consumers within the national security bureaucracy. This course will also explore the subject of intelligence reform in the wake of 9/11 and the passage of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better)

INSS 5305. Intro to Intelligence Analysis.

This course will examine the process of intelligence analysis. The course will focus upon critical thinking, the analytical process, the nature of bias, the avoidance of bias in qualitative analysis, as well as dealing with uncertainty. Central will be the use of hypotheses and argumentation in the analytical process. Students will also learn to categorize intelligence evidence. Causal analysis and interpreting intentions will be stressed. Forecasting procedures, target analysis, and the psychology of intelligence analysis will round out the subjects examined.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better)

INSS 5306. Contemporary Security Studies.

The focus of this course will be on the discussion of various concepts of security, including "human security" and "energy security" in the context of the most pressing contemporary security issues. The aim is to make students aware of the various new and critical approaches to security in contrast to the traditional concepts of "national security." The main part of the course will deal with the non-traditional security issues ranging from terrorism (including cyber-terrorism and CBRNE terrorism) to transnational threats to modern societies. After completion of the course, the students should have gained some understanding of how the security environment of states and societies and also the very notion of security has changed over the last few decades and of what might become the main security challenges of the 21st century.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5307. Open Source Intel Analysis.

This graduate course will examine critically the scope of the open source environment including primary, secondary, and technical sources. It will demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of open sources as a basis for intelligence information and analysis. Students will be exposed to various open source analytic techniques and methodologies. The course will culminate in an analytic, forecasting exercise utilizing various open source techniques including citation analysis and overt human networks. It is recommended that the student complete INSS 5305 prior to this course.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better)

INSS 5308. Propaganda and Influence Ops.

This graduate course will take a broad look at the global information environment. Students will be exposed to past and present attempts to shape the information environment and influence mass and targeted public audiences. Key concepts such as strategic communication, public diplomacy, and intelligence support for information operations will be addressed. The course will closely examine the adversarial influence operations of non-state actors such as As-Sahab, Al-Fajr media, Al-Manar, and various state-run propaganda organizations.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better)

INSS 5309. Technical Intelligence.

General introduction to the capabilities, methods, uses, history, and future of technical intelligence collection and analysis. There will be a particular focus on the uses and history of signals intelligence and imagery intelligence. The second part of the course deals with the increasing transformation of technical intelligence through the development of new and revolutionary technical collection and analysis capabilities as a result of the growth of information technology and other emerging technologies, such as the internet, artificial intelligence, robotics, and nanotechnology.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5310. Intel & Counterterrorism.

This course will examine the evolution and dynamics of contemporary terrorism and political violence, particularly as it pertains to the activities of the global Salafist movement. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of U.S. counterterrorism policy and U.S. intelligence efforts to identify and track terrorist threats around the world. Attention will also be given to collection and analytical issues associated with monitoring, penetrating, and ultimately countering terrorist cells and networks.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better ) OR (INSS 3302 w/B or better)

INSS 5311. Intelligence and Information.

This course examines the basic foundations and concepts for understanding information and its relationship to intelligence. It seeks to explain the process by which information can be converted into knowledge and understanding, particularly in the context of analyzing vexing national security problems. Emphasis is placed on "semantic" information and the significance of meaning and "influential" information or persuasion and its impact on human behavior. The course will also examine the emergence of an information society and the information revolutions experienced throughout human history with a focus on the current era of "Big Data" and its significance for open source intelligence collection and analysis.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5312. Commercial Imagery.

This course explores the domains of open source commercial imagery and remote sensing. These increasingly sophisticate images have numerous applications across a diverse variety of fields such as defense, conservation, emergency response, agriculture, engineering and planning, mapping, and energy. This course is designed to cover the ways in which imagery is obtained and employed, as well as the capabilities of the various sensors utilized on commercial satellite and aerial platforms. This includes optical imaging, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal, radar and light detection and ranging. There will be a particular emphasis on defense and intelligence applications.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5313. Social Media Intelligence.

This course examines the strengths and weaknesses of social media as a source of intelligence. Emphasis will be placed on analytics and trending, collection management, social network dynamics, crowdsourcing, and ethics and privacy issues. Social media can provide viable intelligence for warning, threat assessment, law enforcement investigations, and strategic communication. When analyzed with other sources of intelligence information, social media intelligence can be a particularly valuable tool for intelligence assessments.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5315. Intel & Counterproliferation.

This course will examine the development and contemporary use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high explosive weapons and thier means of delivery. Special emphasis will be placed on U.S. intelligence efforts to identify and track proliferation threats around the world. Attention will also be given to collection and analytical issues associated with this critical national security issue.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better ) OR (INSS 3302 w/B or better)

INSS 5320. Counterintel & Security.

This course will examine the evolution of U.S. counterintelligence (C.I.) organization and operations. The course will focus on basic definitions, actors, objectives, and requirements. Special emphasis will then be placed on selected foreign intelligence services that represent a potential threat to U.S. national security. Attention will also be given to the security threat posed by non-state actors to U.S. government personnel, property, and activities. The course will also explore national C.I. policy and assess the need for reofrm of U.S. domestic intelligence and C.I. efforts more broadly.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5302 w/B or better ) OR (INSS 3302 w/B or better)

INSS 5325. Political Economy of Terrorism.

The purpose of this graduate course is to present an up-to-date survey of the study of terrorism. Where possible, the course will apply theoretical and statistical tools so the student can understand why governments and terrorists take certain actions even when, on occasion, these actions may be against their interests. Often, we are able to identify behavior that appears counterintuitive until the underlying strategic interactions among agents (for example, among targeted governments) are understood. Throughout the course, we bring forth insights that are against conventional wisdom, but which are supported by the data. Throughout the course, tools of economic analysis (e.g., indifference curves, constrained optimization, and simple market analysis) are applied to the study of terrorism. In addition, simple game theory is also applied.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5335. Transnational Criminal Orgs.

This course aims to introduce the subject of transnational ciminal organizations (TCOs) as a threat to national and international security. The course will discuss the history of organized crime (including the Mafia, the Yakuza, the Triades, and American gangsterism), its main characteristics, how it differs from "ordinary" crime, and how it has changed in the decades after the Second World War. The focus will be on the "new organized crime," its main business activities (arms-, drug-, and human- trafficking; corporate fraud; cyber crime; and terrorism), and on what kind of challenges these organizations pose to states and to international security, in particular with regard to organized-crime-related violence, the growing global shadow economy, and the problem of political corruption. The final part of the course will explore the various options of combating TCOs, for examplelegislative and law enforcement measures, the role of intelligence and covert action, military intervention and international cooperation, in tackling money laundering, and in legal prosecution.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5340. Pro-Seminar Homeland Security.

This course examines the scope and breadth of homeland and national security issues. It serves as a professional overview of the field and its intelligence sub-fields and includes the emergency management/natural disaster response aspects of the field.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5342. Risk Analysis.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and skills of risk perception, assessement, and aversion, risk management and communication, and their roles in homeland security.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5343. Crime & Border Security.

This graduate course focuses on the impact of globalization on crime and border security. Special emphasis will be placed on human, drug, and arms trafficking along the U.S.- Mexico border, but will also provide comparative examples from border regions around the world. The role of drug cartels, criminal gangs, and corruption will be addressed. Attention will also be given to the U.S.-Canadian border. Other serious crime such as fraud, indentity theft, and cybercrime will be explored. This course will also review current and past strategies for maintaining border security and limiting the flow of criminal activity into the United States.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5344. Emergency Management.

This graduate course focuses on the fundamental concepts involved in preparing for and managing the response to a catastrophic emergency event such as fire, earthquake, terrorist act, biological materials release, hazardous material spill, weather related disaster, or internal sabotage. Heavy emphasis is placed on interagency communication and coordination in emergency events. The course outlines the practical steps needed to develop an effective emergency response plan, and outlines how such a plan should be organized and executed.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5346. Public Hlth & Homeland Securit.

This graduate course focuses on policy responses to bioterrorism and emerging public health threats such as pandemic flu. Topics include the science of biological weapons and threats, the history of bioterrorism and weaponization, verification and monitoring, scenario building, national security decision-making as it pertains to biothreats, and public health policy and infrastructure.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5347. Critical Infrastructure Prtcn.

This graduate course examines the 11 major categories of the nation's critical infrastructure as outlined by the US Department of Homeland Security with a particular emphasis on their dimensions, operational responsibility, and unique vulnerabilities. Strategies for critical infrastructure protection will be addressed as will the means for establishing priorities for protecting key infrastructure assets.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5351. Professional Skills.

Professional Skills (3-0) An exploration of skills, values, and behaviors that contribute to success within the profession. Skills to be developed may include professional report writing, presentations, time management, project management, and others. Discussions of values and behaviors may include such matters as ethics and professionalism among others. Departmental approval required.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5355. Geospatial Intelligence.

This course examines the varied uses of geospatial intelligence in support of U.S. national and homeland security. The analysis, management, and fusion of geospatial data with other forms of intelligence will be emphasized. Case studies involving insurgency, terrorism, and transnational crime are examined. Applications for homeland security such as emergency response, critical infrastructure protection, biothreats, and maritime and border security are considered.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5361. Applied Statistics in Intellig.

This course provides the basic elements of statistics and analytical techniques for intelligence and national security stemming from applications within these fields. This empirical approach will allow students to formulate and demonstrate conceptual understanding of problems in areas such as terrorism, biosecurity, homeland security, and defense via statistics. Practical assignments in text form will be supported by computer tasks to master basic software such as Excel and SPSS.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5300 w/B or better ) OR (POLS 5300 w/B or better ) OR (PAD 5300 w/B or better)

INSS 5366. Security Studies Internship.

Security Studies Internship (0-0-3) Practical internship experience with a governmental agency, selected in consultation with the INSS program advisor. The experience consists of at least twenty hours of work per week, under close supervision by the agency and the program advisor. A substantive paper, project, or verification of ample agency production commensurate with graduate level work is required. Departmental approval is required.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
3 Other Hours

INSS 5380. Selected Problems in Intel.

Selected Problems in Intelligence (3-0) This course will address particularized intelligence and national security issues in depth. Examples of issues that may be investigated are intelligence failures, specific modes of intelligence activity (such as electronic intelligence), or the operational activities of a particular intelligence or national security agency. It may also be used to provide credit for Model NATO or Model Arab programs, in support of study in foreign venues under the Intelligence Community Scholar program, or cross listing with other course offerings at the graduate level. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5390. Capstone.

Requires students to integrate and apply core knowledge and research skills to the analysis of a national security and intelligence problem. This course is to be taken in the student's final semester in the program.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

INSS 5398. Thesis.

As part of this course, the student will successfully prepare and defend a prospectus for the M.S. thesis. The prospectus must be approved by the student's thesis committee. Failure to meet this requirement within two long semesters will preclude continuance of the student in the M.S. degree program.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
3 Other Hours

INSS 5399. Thesis.

The student will successfully prepare and defend the M.S. thesis to his/her committee. Continuous enrollment is mandatory while working on the thesis.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
3 Other Hours

Prerequisite(s): (INSS 5398 w/P or better)

INSS 5466. Security Studies Internship.

Security Studies Internship (0-0-4) Practical internship experience with a governmental agency selected in consultation with the INSS program advisor. The experience consists of at least twenty hours of work per week, under close supervision by the agency and the program advisor. A substantive paper, project, or verification of ample agency production commensurate with graduate level work is required. Departmental approval is required.

4 Credit Hours
4 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
4 Other Hours

INSS 5566. Security Studies Internship.

Security Studies Internship (0-0-5) Practical internship experience with a governmental agency, selected in consultation with the INSS program advisor. The experience consists of at least twenty hours of work per week, under close supervision by the agency and the program advisor. A substantive paper, project, or verification of ample agency producation commensurate with graduate level work is requied. Departmental approval is required.

5 Credit Hours
5 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
5 Other Hours

INSS 5666. Security Studies Internship.

Security Studies Internship (0-0-6) Practical internship experience with a governmental agency, selected in consultation with the INSS program advisor. The experience consists of at least twenty hourse of work per week, under close supervision by the agency and the program advisor. A substantive paper, project, or verification of ample agency production commensurate with graduate level work is required. Departmental approval is required.

6 Credit Hours
6 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
6 Other Hours