Courses

PHIL 1301. Introduction to Philosophy (C).

Introduction to Philosophy (3-0) This course introduces students to some of the major issues in philosophy. The ideas, eras, and important philosophers will be examined. The traditional categories of reality, knowledge, values, and meaning will be the focus, though recent and comparative areas may be included. The development of the student's critical thinking skills is the major objective of this course.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 1304. Logic.

Logic (3-0) (Common Course Number PHIL 2303) A survey of modern logic including traditional logic, fallacies, sentential logic, and predicate logic.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 2306. Ethics (C).

Ethics (3-0) (Common Course Number PHIL 2306) An introduction to topics and core problems relating to the moral evaluation of human motivation and action. The course examines the positions of classical philosophers such as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Sartre, as well as contemporary moral problems that relate to human rights, animal rights and environmental ethics. . . .

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 2313. Chicanos and American Thought.

Chicanos and American Thought (3-0) After an analysis of the intellectual heritage (Pre-Hispanic, Spanish, and Mexican) of present day Chicano, contemporary Chicano value orientations are compared and contrasted with such orientations in American society.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 3301. Philosophy of Mind.

Philosophy of Mind (3-0) This course is a survey of central issues in contemporary philosophy of mind. We will consider different accounts of the relations between minds and the physical world, including whether computers could ever have thoughts or consciousness. Central to our investigation will be the problem of how mental states causally interact with neural states. In addition, we will address questions concerning how much our thoughts and experiences depend on the nature of our environments, and how much they are determined by our innate dispositions.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 3302. Ethical Theory.

Ethical Theory (3-0) Considers the history and development of ethical theory in a comparative Asian/Western context. Theories such as utilitarianism, deontology, contractarianism, communitarianism, pacifism, anarchism, pragmatism, and virtue ethics may be discussed within the context of a diversity of thinkers and textual resources.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 3303. Philosophy of Education.

Philosophy of Education (3-0) Analyzes classical and contemporary theories and practices of education in a global perspective, using mainstream, alternative, and critical approaches. This course is often team taught with professors from Education.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3304. Philosophy of History.

Philosophy of History (3-0) Topics will include matters such as the debate between idealist and materialist interpretations of history, the question of historical "laws" and determinism, the debate over "progress" in history, and the relation between the social and natural sciences.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

Prerequisite(s): (PHIL 1301 w/C or better ) OR (PHIL 2306 w/C or better ) OR (PHIL 1304 w/C or better)

PHIL 3305. Philosophy of Law.

Philosophy of Law (3-0) Analyzes legal issues, theories, and case studies within the framework of Western ethical, social, and political philosophies and the history of jurisprudence. Topics include the origins of law, the relations of law, custom, and ritual, the question of legal "rights", justice, authority and sovereignty, responsibilities and obligations, property rights and distributive justice, pacifism, and civil disobedience.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

Prerequisite(s): (PHIL 1301 w/C or better ) OR (PHIL 2306 w/C or better ) OR (PHIL 1304 w/C or better)

PHIL 3307. Environmental Ethics.

Environmental Ethics (3-0) This course will look at the history of the modern environmental movement, such as it emerged in the US during the nineteenth and twentieth centureis. The course will also examine some of the leading theories and debates, such as among social ecology, deep ecology, ecofeminism, bioregionalism, ecopsychology, Gaia theory, postmodernism, and primitivism. The course will cover as well as the relationship between different religious traditions and environmentalism.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 3308. Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art.

Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art (3-0) An overview of the principal philosophical theories regarding the nature of art and aesthetic sensibility. Examines attempts to define art, explores the foundational ideas of art criticism, and also attempts to relate art to other concerns such as religion, sciences, ethics, politics, and everyday life.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3311. Philosophy of Science.

Philosophy of Science (3-0) Diversity of topics and issues open to instructor, including the debate between scientific realists and various anti-realists (empiricists, phenomenologists, instrumentalists, social constructivists); Kuhn and the sociology of knowledge, post-Kuhnian thinkers such as Lakatos, Latour, and Feyerabend; and feminist and postmodern/postcolonial critiques of science. May also focus on the work of major scientific thinkers like Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3312. Latin American Thought.

Latin American Thought (3-0) After a survey of philosophical developments in Latin America during the colonial period, during the struggles for independence, and in the nineteenth century, the thought of major twentieth century intellectual leaders in Latin America is examined. These include professional philosophers but also certain literary and political figures who expressed significant and influential philosophical positions.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3313. American Philosophy.

American Philosophy (3-0) A consideration of principal figures who have shaped the American philosophical sensibility. Such individuals may include Edwards, Jefferson, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Melville, Pierce, James, Dewey, and Rorty.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3314. Ancient Philosophy.

Ancient Philosophy: The Origins of Western Thought (3-0) Studies of the origin and development of those ideas and problems which have come to characterize the philosophic tradition in the West as reflected in the thought of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3315. Medieval Philosophy.

Medieval Philosophy: The Scholastic Synthesis (3-0) Studies the philosphies of the medieval Western and Eastern Mediterranean cultures. Philosophers to be examined include Augustine, Boethius, Ibn-Cina, Ibn-Rushd, Ibn-Gabirol, Maimonides, Aquinas, Scotus, Bonaventure, and Occam.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3317. Modern Philosophy.

Modern Philosophy (3-0) This course focuses on the classical philosophical traditions of Rationalism (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz), Empiricism (Locke, Berkeley, Hume), and the critical, ethical philosophy of Kant. Other topics could also include examination of the emergence of the scientific method, and Enlightenment figures such as Voltaire and Diderot. Prerequiste: Junior standing.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3318. Nineteenth Century Philosophy.

Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3-0) Examines topics such as the reaction to Kant's critiques by Positivism (Comte and followers) on the one hand,and Idealism (Fichte, Schelling, Hegel) on the other. The course also examines the philosophical impact of Darwin, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3322. Philosophy of Religion.

Philosophy of Religion (3-0) This course is not a comparative study of religion, but rather provides an opportunity to examine the phenomena of western and non-western religions philosophically. The content of this course will vary according to the instructor but could examine such issues as belief and knowledge in God, gods, or goddesses; religious myth, experience and ritual; religious community; and religious ethics. .

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3325. Social Philosophy.

Social Philosophy (3-0) This course examines the philosophical and political issues of social existence. It considers topics such as justice, freedom, rights, authority, social contract theory, political legitimacy, civil disobedience, feminism, postmodern theory, environmental theory, distributive justice, as well as various socio-political ideologies such as Liberalism, Capitalism, Socialism, Fascism, and Anarchism.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3335. Twentieth Century Philosophy.

Twentieth Century Philosophy (3-0) This course will consider the principal forms of contemporary philosophy, such as logical positivism, linguistic analysis, existentialism, phenomenology, critical theory and postmodernism. May be repeated when course content varies. . .

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3340. Asian Philosophies.

Asian Philosophies (3-0) A consideration of classical Asian philosophical texts and traditions. Topics are normally selected from either the Chinese or Indian traditions. A course on classical Chinese philosophy would focus upon the principal texts of Confucianism and Daoism. A focus upon Indian philosophy would lead to a consideration of schools such as Advaita Vedanta, Upanishadic Theism, and Nyaya.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 3341. Political Philosophy.

Political philosophy examines fundamental questions concerning the nature of political life. This course will approach these questions from metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical perspectives, among others. It will focus on work done on these topics in contemporary political philosophy by authors such as John Rawls, Robert Nozick, and Martha Nussbaum. Cross-listed with POLS 4342 Contemporary Political Thought.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 4301. Bioethics.

PHIL 4301 Bioethics (3-0) This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of ethical issues in the biological and health sciences, combining methodologies from both philosophy and the natural sciences. It introduces students to the practice of applying ethical reasoning to issues arising in the fields of biomedicine, biotechnology, and clinical health. Although special focus is given to interpersonal issues and to research ethics in the sciences, examinations of specific issues in various fields such as reproductive and genetic law, end of life problems, health care justice, and eugenics could also be regularly included.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 4302. Metaphysics.

Metaphysics (3-0) Often called ontology or speculative philosophy, metaphysics studies the attempts to develop coherent sets of principles by which to understand comprehensive notions such as being and change, appearance and reality, God, freedom, mind and the universe.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 4304. Latin American Philosophy.

Latin American Philosophy (3-0) A detailed examination of the philosophical positions of such nineteenth and twentieth century Latin American scholars as Domingo Faustino (Argentina), Jose Enrique Rodo (Uruguay), Francisco Romereo (Argentina), Carols Vaz Ferreira (Uraguay), and the Mexicans: Jose Vasconcelos, Antonio Caso, Vincente Lombardo Toledana, and Samuel Ramos.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 4306. Philosophical Methods.

Philosophical Methods (3-0) A close analysis of specific texts in World Philosophy, the sciences, and literature aimed at understanding the origins of the plurality of perspectives in accordance with which we have come to understand the world. Presents students with a variety of approaches used to learn and practice philosophy, ranging from the Socratic method, phenomenology, analytical philosophy to feminism, critical theory, and postmodern theory.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 4307. Feminist Philosophy.

Feminist philosophy is a field of inquiry that challenges traditional answers to and proposes competing answers to central questions in a variety of philosophical subfields, such as ethics, political philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of science, among others. It does so on the grounds that oppression and privileges, conceptions of gender, and women's lives deserve philosophical consideration and may change the way that we understand philosophical problems. This course will introduce students to the variety of views in feminist philosophy or it will focus on a particular set of philosophical arguments within one subfield. Crosslisted with WS 4307.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 4311. Theories of Knowledge.

Theories of Knowledge (3-0) Analysis of the philosophical problems regarding the origins, criteria, and limits of knowledge. Discusses classic debates such as between rationalism and empiricism and realism and non-realism, as well as more current issues including cognitive science, cognitive neuroscience, cognitive ethology (animal intelligence), artificial intelligence, robotics, artificial life, and how these developments are producing new paradigms of mind and knowledge.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

PHIL 4351. Great Philosophers.

Great Philosophers (3-0) The life and work of one or more of the most influential thinkers in world philosophy will be the focus of this course. Such thinkers include Confucius, Plato, Aristotle, Ortega, Nietzsche, Marx, Kant, Hegel, Dewey, Singer. May be repeated when the course content varies.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 4352. Problems in Philosophy Seminar.

Problems in Philosophy Seminars (3-0) A course with issues of current interest to contemporary philosophers. Recent topics have included postmodernism, literature and philosophy, technological society, movies and the making of the American mind, the emergence of world philosophy, and medical ethics.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
3 Lecture Hours
0 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR

PHIL 4353. Independent Study.

Independent Study (0-0-3) Student research under supervision of the staff.

3 Credit Hours
3 Total Contact Hours
0 Lab Hours
0 Lecture Hours
3 Other Hours

Classification Restrictions:
Restricted to class of JR,SR